If you didn’t already know, we’re kind of in love with hemp. We use it to make our bags, advocate for the end of its prohibition, and love its cousin cannabis. Industrial hemp is an agricultural plant that has grown for centuries both naturally and through man-made efforts, and today, has tons of applications for its use. Hemp has tons of uses, hemp oil is a popular remedy for many medical uses, hemp seed oil can be added to food as a healthy boost, and hemp hearts are a great addition to a smoothie. Even though it doesn’t have THC, hemp is an awesome cousin to the cannabis plant. We blend hemp with recycled polyester to make our signature fabric, Hempster. It’s both durable and soft, thanks to the incredibly strong fibers. We owe a lot to this versatile plant and love sharing the many other uses of this gift from Mother Nature, starting with one of our favorites, hemp textiles. Check out our other favorite uses for hemp below.

Textiles

Hemp and marijuana fibers make incredibly durable and long lasting fabric! They are so tough, in fact, that we had to blend ours with recycled polyester to soften them up and add various colors to our collection. We use hemp because we seriously love the plant and want to support a positive representation of it. Being the misunderstood “weed” it is, we love showing others that hemp has many uses (aside from smoking its cousin, cannabis) that make this a seriously powerful plant.

Concrete

Hemp houses? You bet. Hemp-crete is an incredibly beneficial building material. Hemp concrete is non-toxic, has no off-gassing, uses no solvents, is mold resistant, has a high vapor permeability, is humidity controlled, and very durable. It’s also sustainable, fire and pest resistant, self temperature and humidity regulating, and is a very effective insulator. It’s basically the whole package. Plus, how cool would it be to say, “my house is made of hemp”?

Beauty Products

Hemp contains a variety of beneficial cannabinoids and terpenes. These contribute to the effects of hemp. Some cannabinoids, like CBD, have been linked to the slowing down of cancerous cells, can work as an anti-depressant, and have a host of other beneficial properties. And that’s just one of the over 100 cannabinoids found in hemp! When extracted, these beneficial properties can be used in beauty products to help improve skin texture, support healthy hair growth, and can even be used to make more natural makeup solutions (instead of the chemical concoction many of us put on our faces today). The terpenes are used to create a fragrant and lively smell for the product as well as contribute to overall sense of wellbeing. Terpenes are found in the plants you know and love like lemons, pinecones, oranges, and of course, hemp.

Milk

Looking for a dairy alternative? Hemp can help. When ground up, hemp seeds can be used to make a dairy alternative very similar to almond or soy milk. Hemp seeds are also high in protein and nutrients, so you can throw those extra seeds in a smoothie for an extra boost of wellness any time of the day.

Medicine

One of our favorite uses for hemp is it’s medicinal uses. Hemp contains over 100 cannabinoids, each with their own set of benefits. One of the most well known cannabinoids is CBD. CBD has a long track record of improving health, including working as an anti-depressant, insomnia relief, anti-inflammatory and pain reducing, anti-seizure, and so much more. Seriously, we could go on all day about CBD. Best of all, it has over 100 more cannabinoids that hold medicinal benefits, many that we are still discovering and learning about today.

Protein

If you’re a smoothie person, throw some hemp seeds into your next drink. They are high in omega-3 and omega-6 acids, and are high in protein, are a good source of vitamin E and minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron and zinc. You can throw them in a smoothie, your next bowl of oatmeal, or even just a handful to snack on.

Paper

Save the trees! Hemp is a sustainable and renewable source of paper. Unlike trees that take decades to grow and house a variety of wildlife, hemp can grow to maturity in under a year. According to the Ministry of Hemp, 1 acre of hemp can produce as much paper as 4-10 acres of trees over a 20 year cycle. Hemp paper also doesn’t yellow or crack, or deteriorate like tree paper. Now for the real question – can you use it as rolling paper? Just kidding. But that would be sweet if you could.

Hemp has tons of beneficial uses, making our bags is just one of the many. If you support hemp, let us know in the comments below and share this article with someone who should see the many uses it has!

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